Muste, A. J. (Abraham John), 1885-1967

Alternative names
Dates:
birth 1885‑01‑08
death 1967‑02‑11
Gender:
Male
NLA, LC
eng Latin Alphabet

Biographical notes:

Clergyman, pacifist.

From the description of Reminiscences of Abraham John Muste : oral history, 1954. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 309741542

From the description of Reminiscences of Abraham John Muste : oral history, 1965. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 122681124

A.J. Muste (1885-1967). Muste's involvement as a labor organizer began in 1919. When he led strikes in the textile mills of Lawrence, Mass. He became director of the Brookwood Labor College in Katonah, New York, remaining there until 1931. Muste served as national chairman of the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR), 1926-1929. He was one of the founders of the Conference for Progressive Labor Action (CPLA) in 1929 and in 1934 facilitated the merger of the CPLA with Trotskyists to form the short-lived Workers Party of America. Muste was director of the Presbyterian Labor Temple from 1937 to 1940. In 1940 he became executive director of the FOR, a position he held until his retirement in 1953.

From the description of A.J. Muste. Papers, 1920-1967. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 122405465

Muste graduated as valedictorian from Hope College in 1905. After a year of teaching, Muste entered New Brunswick Theological Seminary and was ordained in 1909. In 1915, after earning a B.D. from the more liberal Union Theological Seminary, he broke with the Dutch Reformed church. After four years of shifting ideologies, Muste was chosen as general secretary of the newly formed Amalgamated Textile Workers Union. During the next twenty years Muste became increasingly involved in radical reform movements. In 1936, however, he experienced a revelation and returned to Christian pacifism, a faith that guided him for the rest of his life. Muste later chaired the Committee for Nonviolent Action and was a forerunner of the anti-Vietnam War movement in the mid-60s.

From the description of Papers, 1905-1985. (Joint Archive of Holland, History Research Center). WorldCat record id: 30122694

Muste was the Valedictorian of Hope College in 1905. After a year of teaching, Muste entered New Brunswick Theological Seminary and was ordained in 1909. In 1915, after earning a B.D. from the more liberal Union Theological Seminary, he broke with the Dutch Reformed Church. After four years of shifting ideologies, Muste was chosen as general secretary of the newly formed Amalgamated Textile Workers Union. During the next twenty years Muste became increasingly involved in radical reform movements. In 1936, however, he experienced a revelation and returned to Christian pacifism, a faith that guided him for the rest of his life. Muste chaired the committee for nonviolent action and was a forerunner of the anti-Vietnam War movement in the mid-1960s.

From the description of Papers, 1910-1985. (Joint Archive of Holland, History Research Center). WorldCat record id: 30451953



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