Bolton, Chester Castle, 1882-1939

Alternative names
Dates:
birth 1882‑09‑05
death 1939‑10‑29
Gender:
WorldCat, umi, LC, yale

Biographical notes:

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Ohio's 22nd Congressional district from 1928-39. Bolton served previously in the Ohio State Senate from 1922-28. During World War I, Bolton served in the Ordnance Dept. and the War Industries Board, and became aide to Benedict Crowell, assistant secretary of war. As a U.S. Congressman, Bolton was esteemed representative of the Great Lakes states on the Rivers and Harbors Committee, and served on the Appropriations Committee and numerous other committees. Bolton was chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee in 1934 and 1936, and helped to bring the Republican National Convention to Cleveland, Ohio in 1936. His widow, Frances Payne Bolton, succeeded him in Congress following his death in 1939.

From the description of Papers, 1916-1943. (Rhinelander District Library). WorldCat record id: 23741370

Chester Castle Bolton (1882-1939) was born in Cleveland, Ohio, to industrialist Charles Chester Bolton and Julia Castle Bolton. Educated in public schools and University School, he graduated with an A.B. from Harvard in 1905. While employed in the steel industry from 1905-1917, Bolton served in the Ohio National Guard. In 1917 he was commissioned as Captain in the United States Army, entering active service in the Ordnance Department. He was initially assigned to the War Industries Board, and later transferred to the General Staff in Washington, serving as aide to Benedict Crowell, assistant secretary of war. In 1918 he was promoted to rank of Lt. Colonel and was sent to the Army War College for general field instruction. Upon graduation he was assigned to duty as Assistant Chief of Staff of the 101st Division, retaining this post for the duration of World War I. He was then reassigned to the United States Army General Staff until his discharge from the service in December 1918.

Following his discharge, Bolton returned to business pursuits in Cleveland and began his political career as a member of the Lyndhurst Village Council. In 1922 he was elected to the Ohio State Senate, in which he served until 1928 as chairman of the committees on Taxation; on Banks and Trust Companies; Utilities; and the Joint Committee on Taxation. He also served as a member of the committees on Military Affairs; on Manufacture; on Commerce, Fish and Game; and on Soldiers and Sailors Homes.

In 1928 Bolton was elected to the United States House of Representatives from Ohio's twenty-second Congressional district. He was re-elected in 1930, 1932, 1934, and 1938. Bolton served on the Rivers and Harbors Committee (where he was esteemed as the representative of the Great Lakes states), and on the Appropriations Committee, serving on subcommittees on the War Department, on Deficiency, and Independent Offices; and on the Select Committee on Conservation of Wildlife Resources, the Migratory Bird Commission (1932-1936), and the George Rogers Clark Sesquicentennial Commission (1935-1936).

Bolton began his participation in the National Republican organization in 1928, serving as a delegate to the Republican National Convention. In 1934 and 1936 he served as chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee, during the period when the Republican Party was most discredited by the Great Depression. As Chairman, Bolton was concerned with the defining of Republican policy, and the election of more Republicans into the United States Congress. In 1936 he helped bring the Republican National Convention to Cleveland and served as chairman of the Local Arrangements Committee.

In addition to his public duties, Bolton remained active in the civic and business life of Cleveland, serving as a director of many private companies, and as a trustee of several philanthropic and educational organizations. He was an original member and organizer of the Community Fund Council, which was a precursor to the Welfare Federation of Cleveland. Bolton was also a member of many local and national clubs, and was particularly interested in the development of the American Legion.

Chester Bolton married Frances Payne Bingham (1885-1977), daughter of Cleveland industrialist Charles William Bingham, in 1907. They had four children: Charles Bingham (1909-1976), Kenyon Castle (1912-1986), Oliver Payne (1917-1972), and Elizabeth (1919-1919). On their farms in Lyndhurst and Ravenna, the Boltons raised pure-bred Guernsey cattle and for ten years (1922-1932) Bolton was president of the Ohio Guernsey Breeders Association. Following his death from heart disease in 1939, Bolton's widow succeeded him in Congress, a position Mrs. Bolton retained until 1969.

click here to view the Encyclopedia of Cleveland History entry for Chester Castle Bolton

click here to view the Encyclopedia of Cleveland History entry for Frances Payne Bolton

click here to view the Encyclopedia of Cleveland History entry for William B. Castle click here to view the Encyclopedia of Cleveland History entry for Kenyon C. Bolton

From the guide to the Chester Castle Bolton Papers, 1915-1943, (Western Reserve Historical Society)

Chester Castle Bolton (1882-1939) was born in Cleveland, Ohio, to industrialist Charles Chester Bolton and Julia Castle Bolton. Educated in public schools and University School, he graduated with an A.B. from Harvard in 1905. While employed in the steel industry from 1905-1917, Bolton served in the Ohio National Guard. In 1917 he was commissioned as Captain in the United States Army, entering active service in the Ordnance Department. He was initially assigned to the War Industries Board, and later transferred to the General Staff in Washington, serving as aide to Benedict Crowell, assistant secretary of war. In 1918 he was promoted to rank of Lt. Colonel and was sent to the Army War College for general field instruction. Upon graduation he was assigned to duty as Assistant Chief of Staff of the 101st Division, retaining this post for the duration of World War I. He was then reassigned to the United States Army General Staff until his discharge from the service in December 1918.

Following his discharge, Bolton returned to business pursuits in Cleveland and began his political career as a member of the Lyndhurst Village Council. In 1922 he was elected to the Ohio State Senate, in which he served until 1928 as chairman of the committees on Taxation; on Banks and Trust Companies; Utilities; and the Joint Committee on Taxation. He also served as a member of the committees on Military Affairs; on Manufacture; on Commerce, Fish and Game; and on Soldiers and Sailors Homes.

In 1928 Bolton was elected to the United States House of Representatives from Ohio's twenty-second Congressional district. He was re-elected in 1930, 1932, 1934, and 1938. Bolton served on the Rivers and Harbors Committee (where he was esteemed as the representative of the Great Lakes states), and on the Appropriations Committee, serving on subcommittees on the War Department, on Deficiency, and Independent Offices; and on the Select Committee on Conservation of Wildlife Resources, the Migratory Bird Commission (1932-1936), and the George Rogers Clark Sesquicentennial Commission (1935-1936).

Bolton began his participation in the National Republican organization in 1928, serving as a delegate to the Republican National Convention. In 1934 and 1936 he served as chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee, during the period when the Republican Party was most discredited by the Great Depression. As Chairman, Bolton was concerned with the defining of Republican policy, and the election of more Republicans into the United States Congress. In 1936 he helped bring the Republican National Convention to Cleveland and served as chairman of the Local Arrangements Committee.

In addition to his public duties, Bolton remained active in the civic and business life of Cleveland, serving as a director of many private companies, and as a trustee of several philanthropic and educational organizations. He was an original member and organizer of the Community Fund Council, which was a precursor to the Welfare Federation of Cleveland. Bolton was also a member of many local and national clubs, and was particularly interested in the development of the American Legion.

Chester Bolton married Frances Payne Bingham (1885-1977), daughter of Cleveland industrialist Charles William Bingham, in 1907. They had four children: Charles Bingham (1909-1976), Kenyon Castle (1912-1986), Oliver Payne (1917-1972), and Elizabeth (1919-1919). On their farms in Lyndhurst and Ravenna, the Boltons raised pure-bred Guernsey cattle and for ten years (1922-1932) Bolton was president of the Ohio Guernsey Breeders Association. Following his death from heart disease in 1939, Bolton's widow succeeded him in Congress, a position Mrs. Bolton retained until 1969.

click here to view the Encyclopedia of Cleveland History entry for Chester Castle Bolton

From the guide to the Chester Castle Bolton Photographs, 1917, (Western Reserve Historical Society)



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