White, Andrew Dickson, 1832-1918

Alternative names
Dates:
birth 1832‑11‑07
death 1918‑11‑04
Gender:
VIAF, syru, aps, inu, oac, LC, fivecol, nyu, NLA, WorldCat, umi, crnlu, harvard, lc, yale

Biographical notes:

The second International Peace Conference was held at the Hague in 1907.

From the description of Hague Peace Conference documents, 1907. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 64052217

Ambassador to Russia; first president of Cornell University.

From the description of Andrew Dickson White papers, 1901-1902. (New York State Historical Documents). WorldCat record id: 155410378

Andrew Dickson White was born at Homer, New York, November 7, 1832. He graduated from Yale University in 1853, then after some years of further study in Paris and Berlin, he became an attaché of the United States Legation at St. Petersburg. In 1857 he came to the University of Michigan as professor of history and English literature. Although he was elected to the New York State Senate in 1863, he continued to have some responsibilities at the U-M until 1867, when he resigned to accept the presidency of Cornell University. In addition White accepted was active in the foreign service of the United States. He was Special Commissioner of the United States to the Republic of Santo Domingo in 1871, Commissioner to the Paris Exposition in 1878, and United States Minister to Germany, 1879-1881. From 1892 to 1874 he was United States Minister to Russia. He also served on the Venezuela Commission 1896-1897, and was Ambassador to Germany from 1897 to 1902. He died November 4, 1918.

From the guide to the Andrew Dickson White papers [microform], 1857-1867, (Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan)

Epithet: US Ambassador to Berlin

British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000001086.0x00037c

Andrew Dickson White was an educator and statesman, best known as the first president of Cornell University. Born in Homer, New York, and educated at Geneva College and Yale University, he determined to be an educator while travelling in Europe, accepting a job at the University of Michigan. While serving in the New York State Senate, he co-founded and became the first president of Cornell University, instituting significant educational reforms during his tenure. He continued to be active in politics, running for office unsucessfully several times and serving as a diplomat, culimnating in his appointment as ambassador to Germany. White was also a successful essayist and wrote several monographs with historical or political themes.

From the description of Andrew D. White letter to Howard Crosby, 1874 July 11. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 76756407

American university president and diplomat.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Ithaca, N.Y., to the editors of The Critic [Jeannette L. and Joseph B. Gilder], 1884 Aug. 25. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 646049464

Professor of history at University of Michigan 1856-1865, later President of Cornell University, Minister to Russia, and Ambassador to Germany.

From the guide to the Andrew Dickson White lectures, 1861-1912, (Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan)

University president; historian.

From the description of Letters, 1873-1894, to Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen and S. S. McClure [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647817395

American educator and diplomat.

From the description of Autograph letters signed (3) : Munich, to Dr. Baldwin, 1894 Oct. 17 and 30 and Nov. 2. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270861144

From the description of Autograph note signed : Ithaca, N.Y., to the N.Y. Daily Tribune, 1882 Jun. 9. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270588882

Educator, diplomat, and author.

From the description of Andrew Dickson White correspondence, 1879 April 28. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70981351

Professor of history at University of Michigan, later President of Cornell University, Minister to Russia, and Ambassador to Germany.

From the description of Andrew Dickson White papers, 1857-1867. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 34423613

Educator, diplomat, president of Cornell University.

Andrew D. White was born in 1832 in Homer, New York. He attended Geneva College (now Hobart College), Geneva, New York, and Yale University, graduating in Yale's class of 1853. After teaching history and English literature at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, he was elected to the New York State Senate, and served as senator for the Syracuse area from 1864 to 1867. There he met Ezra Cornell, and as chairman of the Senate Education Committee, he became involved in efforts to charter Cornell University as the state's land grant college. The bill chartering Cornell University was passed in April 1865; White became the University's first president in 1866. White was instrumental in developing the history and political science departments at Cornell, and took special interest in the library and the architecture of the new university. His 20-year tenure as University president was interrupted by a visit to Santo Domingo with a Presidential commission in 1871, by a European tour from 1876 to 1878, and by a term as United States Minister to Berlin from 1879 to 1881. White resigned the University presidency in 1885, and traveled extensively in Europe. After the death of his first wife, Mary Amanda Outwater, he gave a lecture tour in the United States, returned to Europe, and finally joined Willard Fiske for a journey to Egypt, Greece and Turkey.

In September 1890, White married Helen Magill, the daughter of Swarthmore College President Edward Hicks Magill, and the first woman to receive the Ph.D. in the United States. White served in many diplomatic roles, as Minister to Russia from 1893 to 1894 and Ambassador to Germany from 1897 to 1902. He was president of the American delegation to the Peace Conference at The Hague in 1899. White returned to Ithaca in 1904, where he remained until his death in 1918. He authored many books, including A HISTORY OF THE WARFARE OF SCIENCE WITH THEOLOGY IN CHRISTENDOM, and other articles and essays.

From the description of Andrew Dickson White papers, 1832-1919. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 123436745

Educator, diplomat, president of Cornell University.

Andrew D. White was born in 1832 in Homer, New York. He attended Geneva College, (now Hobart College), Geneva, New York, and Yale University, graduating in Yale's class of 1853. After teaching history and English literature at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, he was elected to the New York State Senate, and served as senator for the Syracuse area from 1864 to 1867. There he met Ezra Cornell, and as chairman of the Senate Education Committee, he became involved in efforts to charter Cornell University as the state's land grant college. The bill chartering Cornell University was passed in April 1865; White became the University's first president in 1866. White was instrumental in developing the history and political science departments at Cornell, and took special interest in the library and the architecture of the new university. His 20-year tenure as University president was interrupted by a visit to Santo Domingo with a Presidential commission in 1871, by a European tour from 1876 to 1878, and by a term as United States Minister to Berlin from 1879 to 1881. White resigned the University presidency in 1885, and traveled extensively in Europe. After the death of his first wife, Mary Amanda Outwater, he gave a lecture tour in the United States, returned to Europe, and finally joined Willard Fiske for a journey to Egypt, Greece and Turkey.

In September 1890, White married Helen Magill, the daughter of Swarthmore College President Edward Hicks Magill, and the first woman to receive the Ph.D. in the United States. White served in many diplomatic roles, as Minister to Russia from 1893 to 1894 and Ambassador to Germany from 1897 to 1902. He was president of the American delegation to the Peace Conference at The Hague in 1899. White returned to Ithaca in 1904, where he remained until his death in 1918. He authored many books, including A HISTORY OF THE WARFARE OF SCIENCE WITH THEOLOGY IN CHRISTENDOM, and other articles and essays.

From the description of Andrew Dickson White papers, 1832-1919. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 63944786

Andrew D. White was born in 1832 in Homer, New York. He attended Geneva College, (now Hobart College), Geneva, New York, and Yale University, graduating in Yale's class of 1853. After teaching history and English literature at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, he was elected to the New York State Senate, and served as senator for the Syracuse area from 1864 to 1867. There he met Ezra Cornell, and as chairman of the Senate Education Committee, he became involved in efforts to charter Cornell University as the state's land grant college. The bill chartering Cornell University was passed in April 1865; White became the University's first president in 1866. White was instrumental in developing the history and political science departments at Cornell, and took special interest in the library and the architecture of the new university. His 20-year tenure as University president was interrupted by a visit to Santo Domingo with a Presidential commission in 1871, by a European tour from 1876 to 1878, and by a term as United States Minister to Berlin from 1879 to 1881. White resigned the University presidency in 1885, and traveled extensively in Europe. After the death of his first wife, Mary Amanda Outwater, he gave a lecture tour in the United States, returned to Europe, and finally joined Willard Fiske for a journey to Egypt, Greece and Turkey.

In September 1890, White married Helen Magill, the daughter of Swarthmore College President Edward Hicks Magill, and the first woman to receive the Ph.D. in the United States. White served in many diplomatic roles, as Minister to Russia from 1893 to 1894 and Ambassador to Germany from 1897 to 1902. He was president of the American delegation to the Peace Conference at The Hague in 1899. White returned to Ithaca in 1904, where he remained until his death in 1918. He authored many books, including A History of the Warfare of Science with Theology in Christendom, and other articles and essays.

From the guide to the Andrew Dickson White papers, 1832-1919., (Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library)



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